Waste of space

surasshu:

All the music from Steven and the Stevens! The songs were composed by guitar hero and storyboard artist Jeff Liu! Also super cute custom cover art by Jeff Liu!

1. The Underwater Temple
Music: Aivi & Surasshu

2. Steven and the Stevens
Music/Guitar: Jeff Liu
Lyrics: Ben Levin, Jeff Liu
Drums: Roger Hicks
Vocals: Zach Callison

3. Time Thing
Music: Aivi & Surasshu

4. Ste-Ste-Steven (Instrumental)
Music/Guitar: Jeff Liu
Drums: Roger Hicks

5. Big Fat Zucchini
Music/Guitar/Lyrics: Jeff Liu
Drums: Roger Hicks
Vocals: Zach Callison

6. Battle at the Underwater Temple
Music: Aivi & Surasshu
Electric Guitar: Edwin Rhodes
Violin: Jeff Ball

7. Steven and the Crystal Gems
Music/Guitar: Jeff Liu
Lyrics: Ben Levin, Jeff Liu
Violin: Jeff Ball
Drums: Roger Hicks
Keys: Surasshu
Vocals: Zach Callison, Michaela Dietz, Estelle, Deedee Magno Hall

This is my new favorite album

joedegeorge:

maththeband:

VICE/NOISEY PREMIER OUR NEW MUSIC VIDEO FOR “JANUARY, 2008” FROM OUR NEW ALBUM “STUPID AND WEIRD”

http://noisey.vice.com/blog/math-the-bands-january-2008-video-premiere

COME ON AND SHARE THIS SHIT!!!!!
VIDEO BY MANY HEARTS- http://many-hearts.com/

GET THIS ALBUM OVER A MONTH EARLY HERE: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2145561606/new-math-the-band-album-0

This music video is beautiful, also I’m playing saxophone on this song.  

That girl is so badass and adorable

rresol:

kittenforever:

New video for our latest single “Famous Friends” off our upcoming album PRESSURE. Soon to be released sometime this summer on Guilt Ridden Pop Records!

Will I ever catch you kitties in Ohio?

Goodmorning babe…I pooped the bed.

A song I wrote

Le Tigre-New Kicks

I forgot this song was on This Island and I was listening to it while driving. I don’t know if its because I was particularly ranty today or what but I just got so full of hope and smiles and I got a little teary.

CHANGING THE WORLD ONE PERSON AT A TIME

artemis-gg:

entropic-collapse:

mycolorfulrape:

rozemarsepein:

squinch owl - “what it is”

they have the dreamiest voice. (and I’m in love with niko too. and I’ve never seen anybody play the saw like that before)

One of my fav songs

damn

dang, that voice!

iliveforaliving:

Washington, DC Metro Station on a cold January morning in 2007. The man with a violin played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time approximately. 2 thousand people went through the station, most of them on their way to work. After 3 minutes a middle aged man noticed there was a musician playing. He slowed his pace and stopped for a few seconds and then hurried to meet his schedule.
4 minutes later:The violinist received his first dollar: a woman threw the money in the hat and, without stopping, continued to walk.
6 minutes:
A young man leaned against the wall to listen to him, then looked at his watch and started to walk again.
10 minutes:
A 3-year old boy stopped but his mother tugged him along hurriedly. The kid stopped to look at the violinist again, but the mother pushed hard and the child continued to walk, turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. Every parent, without exception, forced their children to move on quickly.
45 minutes:
The musician played continuously. Only 6 people stopped and listened for a short while. About 20 gave money but continued to walk at their normal pace. The man collected a total of $32.
1 hour:
He finished playing and silence took over. No one noticed. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.
No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the greatest musicians in the world. He played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, with a violin worth $3.5 million dollars. Two days before Joshua Bell sold out a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $100.
This is a true story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste and people’s priorities.
The questions raised:
*In a common place environment at an inappropriate hour, do we perceive beauty?
*Do we stop to appreciate it?
*Do we recognize talent in an unexpected context?
One possible conclusion reached from this experiment could be this:
If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world, playing some of the finest music ever written, with one of the most beautiful instruments ever made…
How many other things are we missing?

iliveforaliving:

Washington, DC Metro Station on a cold January morning in 2007. The man with a violin played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time approximately. 2 thousand people went through the station, most of them on their way to work. After 3 minutes a middle aged man noticed there was a musician playing. He slowed his pace and stopped for a few seconds and then hurried to meet his schedule.

4 minutes later:

The violinist received his first dollar: a woman threw the money in the hat and, without stopping, continued to walk.

6 minutes:

A young man leaned against the wall to listen to him, then looked at his watch and started to walk again.

10 minutes:

A 3-year old boy stopped but his mother tugged him along hurriedly. The kid stopped to look at the violinist again, but the mother pushed hard and the child continued to walk, turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. Every parent, without exception, forced their children to move on quickly.

45 minutes:

The musician played continuously. Only 6 people stopped and listened for a short while. About 20 gave money but continued to walk at their normal pace. The man collected a total of $32.

1 hour:

He finished playing and silence took over. No one noticed. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.

No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the greatest musicians in the world. He played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, with a violin worth $3.5 million dollars. Two days before Joshua Bell sold out a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $100.

This is a true story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste and people’s priorities.

The questions raised:

*In a common place environment at an inappropriate hour, do we perceive beauty?

*Do we stop to appreciate it?

*Do we recognize talent in an unexpected context?

One possible conclusion reached from this experiment could be this:

If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world, playing some of the finest music ever written, with one of the most beautiful instruments ever made…

How many other things are we missing?

inscienceandcatgames:

unconsumption:

Rotterdam-based musician Shelley Rickey makes really cool guitars and ukuleles out of reclaimed and found materials such as cigar boxes, skeleton keys, scrap wood, and more.

In this video (via BoingBoing), Shelley describes (and plays) the above-pictured ukulele; the frets are made from an old bamboo placemat, the string guard is a piece of a metal tea canister, and the tuning pegs are old spools. 
Want to make your own uke? Shelley wrote a tutorial, available here (a downloadable PDF from BUST magazine).
Nice! See Shelley’s Web site — shelleyrickey.blogspot.com — for additional photos and information.
[Thanks, Shelley!]

psst, pacifus. get one of these.

inscienceandcatgames:

unconsumption:

Rotterdam-based musician Shelley Rickey makes really cool guitars and ukuleles out of reclaimed and found materials such as cigar boxes, skeleton keys, scrap wood, and more.

In this video (via BoingBoing), Shelley describes (and plays) the above-pictured ukulele; the frets are made from an old bamboo placemat, the string guard is a piece of a metal tea canister, and the tuning pegs are old spools. 

Want to make your own uke? Shelley wrote a tutorial, available here (a downloadable PDF from BUST magazine).

Nice! See Shelley’s Web site — shelleyrickey.blogspot.com — for additional photos and information.

[Thanks, Shelley!]

psst, pacifus. get one of these.